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  Undershot

 

Common names or abbreviations:

bulletUndershot
bulletUnderbite

Description or definition:

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An undershot bite, or “prognathism,” occurs when the lower jaw extends beyond the upper.  This may happen because the lower jaw has grown too long or the upper jaw is too short.  In most breeds, including the Shiloh Shepherd, an undershot bite is considered a fault.  However, a few breeds such as the Boxer and Bulldog have naturally undershot jaws.

With slightly undershot bites, the incisors may be the only teeth affected.  In extreme cases, the difference in jaw length can result in problems eating, teeth that cannot be used, teeth that interfere with each other, improper wear, and damage to the soft tissues of the opposite jaw by the canines.

Undershot bites tend to run in families and the mode of inheritance is likely to be polygenic.  There is some speculation that selecting for shortened muzzles can lead to undershot bites.

Treatment:

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All dogs should receive routine dental care to prevent tooth decay and check for excess wear.  Treatment for an undershot bite is generally not needed except in the most extreme of cases. 

Links to sites about this disease:

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http://www.lbah.com/Ushot.htm

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http://www.navhda.com/dentition.html

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http://www.ottawavet.com/healthinfo/ncandent.htm

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http://www.ashgi.org/articles/teeth_bite_me.htm

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http://www.ashgi.org/articles/fact_teeth.htm

This summary provided by:

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Jessica S

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Wildfire Kennel

 

 

Dedicated to improving the health of ISSR Shiloh Shepherds.

 


Copyright © 1998 - 2009. Shiloh Shepherd Dog™ Club of America.
All rights reserved. Revised: January 2008

The information on this website was written by ISSR breeders and other concerned individuals, however we are are NOT veterinarians. This information is being provided as a general overview, from information we were able to find about each disease through our own research. These summaries are not intended to be relied upon as medical or veterinary advice, nor do we consider ourselves experts in the veterinary field or in any of these conditions. While we do our best to provide the most up to date information, new research is constantly being done on these diseases. We recommend that you do further study and talk to your veterinarian on any topics you see here, as we cannot guarantee that the information posted here is the most current information available.  This site was originally designed and maintained by Debbie Knatz.