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  Tricuspid Dysplasia

 

Common names or abbreviations:

bulletTricuspid valve dysplasia
bulletTVD

Description or definition:

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Tricuspid valve dysplasia (TVD) is a congenital (present at birth) deformation in the heart valve that separates the right atrium and the right ventricle.

The right atrium takes blood from the veins of the body that is low in oxygen.  This blood then flows into the right ventricle which contracts and sends the blood to the lungs to get oxygen.  The tricuspid valve allows blood to flow in one direction only from the right atrium to the right ventricle when the heart beats.  Malformation (dysplasia) of the right atrioventricular (tricuspid) valve causes backflow of blood into the right atrium.  This backflow of blood is called tricuspid regurgitation.  Some puppies with this condition may also have abnormal narrowing (stenosis) of the valve.
 

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Although this condition is present from birth, many puppies with TVD do not show any clinical symptoms and appear healthy.  The severity of the symptoms are directly related to the size of the leak.  Dogs with mild cases of tricuspid dysplasia will likely have a normal life span.  More severely affected animals with a greater degree of regurgitation and/or stenosis across the defective valve, will eventually develop right‑sided heart failure.  In the most severe cases, the lifespan is usually 1-3 years.

Symptoms:

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Leakage from a dysplastic tricuspid valve that is significant enough to cause health problems is usually detectable as a heart murmur through the use of a stethoscope.  Sometimes the leakage is so severe that it can be felt by placing a hand on the right side of the chest.  This buzzing sensation is called a “thrill".
 

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Other signs of heart disease may include cool limbs and a distended abdomen due to an enlarged liver or build‑up of fluid.  The dog may also have a reduced tolerance for exercise and may experience  fainting or collapse due to an abnormal heart rhythm.

Diagnosis:

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Most experienced veterinarians can diagnose a heart murmur simply by listening with a stethoscope.  If a heart murmur or thrill is detected in a young dog, an echocardiogram (ultrasound), electrocardiograph (ECG/EKG), and raidiographs (X Ray) should be done to confirm the diagnosis and stage the disease.  Some of the changes that may be seen might include enlargement of the right side of the heart and abnormal heart rhythms. 

Check here for OFA heart clinics in your area: ttp://www.offa.org/clinics.html

Treatment

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Treatment depends on the stage of heart disease and the severity of the condition.  Dogs with very mild cases may live a normal life without the need for any veterinary intervention.  In other cases it may be years before dogs with this condition develop symptoms.  Even dogs with severe TVD may not exhibit any symptoms until they are actually in congestive heart failure.  Treatment may include a special sodium‑restricted diet, exercise restriction, diuretics to reduce  fluid build‑up, and medication to support the failing heart.  However, once symptoms of congestive heart failure occur, the affected dog usually deteriorates rapidly.  Unfortunately, at this point in time the defective valve itself is usually not able to be replaced or repaired surgically.
 

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For more information on heart disease, or if you are concerned about whether your dog has a heart condition, contact your veterinarian.

Links to sites about this disease:

bullethttp://www.barkbytes.com/medical/med0055.htm
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http://www.gglrc.org/articles/tvd.shtml

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http://www.barkbytes.com/medical/med0055.htm

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http://www.upei.ca/~cidd/Diseases/cardiovascular%20diseases/tricuspid%20dysplasia.htm

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http://www.labbies.com/tvd.htm

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http://www.geocities.com/labsr4ulist/pawtvd.htm

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http://www.offa.org/clinics.html

This summary provided by:

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Jessica S

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Wildfire Kennel

 

 

Dedicated to improving the health of ISSR Shiloh Shepherds.

 


Copyright © 1998 - 2009. Shiloh Shepherd Dog™ Club of America.
All rights reserved. Revised: January 2008

The information on this website was written by ISSR breeders and other concerned individuals, however we are are NOT veterinarians. This information is being provided as a general overview, from information we were able to find about each disease through our own research. These summaries are not intended to be relied upon as medical or veterinary advice, nor do we consider ourselves experts in the veterinary field or in any of these conditions. While we do our best to provide the most up to date information, new research is constantly being done on these diseases. We recommend that you do further study and talk to your veterinarian on any topics you see here, as we cannot guarantee that the information posted here is the most current information available.  This site was originally designed and maintained by Debbie Knatz.