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Pancreatic Hypoplasia       

Common names or abbreviations:

bulletPancreatic Hypoplasia

Description or definition:

“Hypoplasia” is the term used when an organ or tissue fails to reach a normal stage of development.  Pancreatic hypoplasia is a congenital defect that refers to a puppy that is born with an underdeveloped pancreas.  The portion of the pancreas that produces the hormone insulin usually develops normally in a puppy with pancreatic hypoplasia.  However, often those cells that produce enzymes for digestion of food do not.  If the pancreas does not produce these digestive enzymes, the puppy develops a condition called pancreatic insufficiency.  Pancreatic hypoplasia is a genetic, immune-mediated condition.

Symptoms:

Symptoms are directly related to the degree of hypoplasia, but generally include poor digestion, weight loss, and chronic diarrhea.

Related Conditions: 

Because all three conditions cause malabsorbtion (poor absorption of essential dietary components) resulting from a failure of the pancreas to produce digestive enzymes, the terms pancreatic acinar atrophy, pancreatic hypoplasia, and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, are often used interchangeably.

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Juvenile pancreatic acinar atrophy:  “Atrophy” is the term used when an organ or tissue loses mass.  Pancreatic atrophy is an immune mediated condition that involves the destruction and  loss of acinar cells.  Acinar cells are the cells that manufacture and secrete digestive enzymes.  In older dogs atrophy can result from chronic pancreatitis.  Pancreatic acinar atrophy is thought to be one of the most common causes of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
 

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 Pancreatic insufficiency: Exocrine Pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a disorder in which the pancreas does not produce an adequate amount of digestive enzymes.  This deficiency results in maldigestion (poor digestion) and malabsorption (poor absorption).  EPI can be caused by pancreatic acinar atrophy, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, or a congenital abnormality such as pancreatic hypoplasia.

Treatment:

Management of pancreatic acinar atrophy, pancreatic hypoplasia, and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is centered around improving the digestion and absorption of essential dietary components through a change in diet, enzyme supplementation, and treatment of diarrhea.

Links to sites about this disease:

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http://www.provet.co.uk/health/glossary/hypoplasia.htm

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http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1580&articleid=864

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http://www.provet.co.uk/health/diseases/git‑pancatro.htm

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http://www.rentonvet.com/encycEntry.cfm?SECTION=Cause&ENTRY=96&COLLECTION=EncycIllness

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http://www.ahc‑online.net/encycEntry.cfm41.htm

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http://ethesis.helsinki.fi/julkaisut/ela/kliin/vk/wiberg/pancreat.pdf

This summary provided by:

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Jessica S

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Wildfire Kennel

 

 

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Copyright © 1998 - 2009. Shiloh Shepherd Dog™ Club of America.
All rights reserved. Revised: January 2008

The information on this website was written by ISSR breeders and other concerned individuals, however we are are NOT veterinarians. This information is being provided as a general overview, from information we were able to find about each disease through our own research. These summaries are not intended to be relied upon as medical or veterinary advice, nor do we consider ourselves experts in the veterinary field or in any of these conditions. While we do our best to provide the most up to date information, new research is constantly being done on these diseases. We recommend that you do further study and talk to your veterinarian on any topics you see here, as we cannot guarantee that the information posted here is the most current information available.  This site was originally designed and maintained by Debbie Knatz.