Home Contact Us
Home
Library of Diseases
Survey
Genetics Lesson
Other Links

 

 

Up
Acral Mutilation Syndrome
Addisons Disease
Aggression
Bloat / Torsion
Canine Sprue
Cataracts
Cleft Lip / Palate
Contact Dermatitis
Corneal Dystrophy
Cryptorchidism
Demodicosis
Degenerative Myelopathy
Elbow Dysplasia
Epilepsy
GlycogenStorage Disease
GSD Foot Pad Syndrome
Hip Dysplasia
Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy
Hypothyroidism
Idiopathic Canine Colitis
Idiopathic Onychomadesis
Imperfect Dentition
Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
Megaesophagus
Mitral Valve Defect
Non-fusion of the Anconeus
OCD (FCP/OCD)
Osteochondritis Dissecans
Overshot
Pancreatic Hypoplasia
Pannus
Panosteitis
Patent Ductus Arteriosis
Pemphigus Vulgaris
Pemphigus Erythematosus
Perianal Fistula
Pulmonic Stenosis
Premature Closure Ulna
S.I. Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome
Sebaceous Adenitis
Selective IgA Deficiency
Spina Bifida
Spinal_Muscular_Atrophy
Subaortic_Stenosis
Symetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Tricuspid Dysplasia
Umbilical Hernia
Undershot
Uroliths

 

 

  Non-fusion of the Anconeus     

 

Common names or abbreviations:

bullet

Ununited Anconeal process (UAP)

Description or definition:

bullet

A dog’s forelimb from the elbow to the wrist is comprised of two bones called the radius and the ulna.  The top end of the ulna has a curved indentation which allows the rounded bottom of the humerus (upper leg bone) to fit together and form a joint.  The top lip of this notch is called the anconeal process, and the bottom lip of this notch is called the coronoid process.  The use of the word process refers to the fact that this is a part of the bone that articulates, or moves, with another bone.

While a normal dog is growing, the anconeal process (AP) fuses with the ulna.  The AP should become fully united (fused) with the ulna by the time the dog is 4-5 months old.  But if it does not unite, it can detach completely and float in the joint capsule, causing pain and eventual arthritis.

UAP is considered to be a form of osteochondritis, with the same causative factors,  heredity, injury, and diet.  For more information see the separate listing for osteochondrosis / osteochondritis dissecans

 Elbow joint incongruity can lead to UAP if the radius grows relatively faster than the ulna.  For more information on joint incongruity see the separate GTF listing for premature closure of the distal ulnar physis.

Symptoms:

bullet

Limping, pain, standing with pasterns turned inward and toes out, standing or moving with elbows out, thickened elbows.

Diagnosis:

bullet

The AP is enclosed within the joint capsule and is only visible in x-rays taken from a specific angle with the elbow partially flexed.  

Treatment:

bullet

There are many different surgical options for AP.  Surgical removal of the fragment is possible, however, can result in instability of the joint and continued degenerative joint disease.  If the problem is diagnosed very early, the AP can sometimes be permanently fixed to the ulna.  Unfortunately, in many cases the AP is already too damaged for this repair by the time diagnosis is made.  Another possible option is ulnar osteotomy (surgical division or excision of the bone, or a portion of the bone) to relieve the pressure on the anconeal process.  In theory, with the pressure removed, the anconeal process can fuse normally.   This procedure, in appropriate cases, is reported to be very effective in restoring pain‑free use of the elbow and delaying the progression of DJD.  With any form of surgery, degenerative joint disease (DJD) is still likely to develop, but at a much slower rate.

For more information about this condition, or if your dog is experiencing lameness, consult your veterinarian for advice.

Links to sites about this disease:

bullet

http://www.nhahonline.com/k9orthopedics.htm

bullet

http://www.vomweberdogs.com/elbow_dysplasia.htm

bullet

http://www.jersey.net/~mountaindog/berner1/elbows.htm

bullet

http://www.offa.org/elbowinfo.html

bullet

http://www‑personal.ksu.edu/~may/UAP

bullet

http://www.animalhospitalchetek.com/encytexts‑z.htm#uap

bullet

http://www.lvvc.net/encycEntry.cfm?ENTRY=11&COLLECTION=EncycIllness&MODE=full

This summary provided by:

bullet

Jessica S

bullet

Wildfire Kennel

 

 

 

Dedicated to improving the health of ISSR Shiloh Shepherds.

 


Copyright © 1998 - 2009. Shiloh Shepherd Dog™ Club of America.
All rights reserved. Revised: January 2008

The information on this website was written by ISSR breeders and other concerned individuals, however we are are NOT veterinarians. This information is being provided as a general overview, from information we were able to find about each disease through our own research. These summaries are not intended to be relied upon as medical or veterinary advice, nor do we consider ourselves experts in the veterinary field or in any of these conditions. While we do our best to provide the most up to date information, new research is constantly being done on these diseases. We recommend that you do further study and talk to your veterinarian on any topics you see here, as we cannot guarantee that the information posted here is the most current information available.  This site was originally designed and maintained by Debbie Knatz.