Home Contact Us
Home
Library of Diseases
Survey
Genetics Lesson
Other Links

 

 

Up
Acral Mutilation Syndrome
Addisons Disease
Aggression
Bloat / Torsion
Canine Sprue
Cataracts
Cleft Lip / Palate
Contact Dermatitis
Corneal Dystrophy
Cryptorchidism
Demodicosis
Degenerative Myelopathy
Elbow Dysplasia
Epilepsy
GlycogenStorage Disease
GSD Foot Pad Syndrome
Hip Dysplasia
Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy
Hypothyroidism
Idiopathic Canine Colitis
Idiopathic Onychomadesis
Imperfect Dentition
Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
Megaesophagus
Mitral Valve Defect
Non-fusion of the Anconeus
OCD (FCP/OCD)
Osteochondritis Dissecans
Overshot
Pancreatic Hypoplasia
Pannus
Panosteitis
Patent Ductus Arteriosis
Pemphigus Vulgaris
Pemphigus Erythematosus
Perianal Fistula
Pulmonic Stenosis
Premature Closure Ulna
S.I. Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome
Sebaceous Adenitis
Selective IgA Deficiency
Spina Bifida
Spinal_Muscular_Atrophy
Subaortic_Stenosis
Symetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Tricuspid Dysplasia
Umbilical Hernia
Undershot
Uroliths

 

 

  Imperfect Dentition

 

Common names or abbreviations:

bulletImperfect Dentition

Description or definition:

bullet

The term “imperfect dentition” is most often used by dog breeders to refer to a deviation from the breed standard in the number of teeth.  However, the term also refers to can any incorrect variation in the size, type, or alignment of teeth in a dog’s mouth.  Problems with dentition tend to run in families, and most are thought to be polygenic in nature.  However, some of the problems may be influenced by external (non-genetic) factors.  Some common improper variances in dentition are discussed below.

Missing Teeth:  A puppy has a set of 28 “milk” teeth (baby teeth).  The total teeth in an adult canine should be 42 (20 in the upper jaw and 22 in the lower).  Missing teeth are considered a fault.  The teeth most likely to be absent are premolars.  However, molars and sometimes incisors may occasionally fail to develop.  The more teeth that are missing, the less functional the bite becomes. 

Retained Teeth: Normally, the roots of the milk teeth are absorbed as adult teeth begin to form and the milk tooth is pushed out as the new tooth emerges.  Retained baby teeth can cause a “malocclusion,” or misalignment of the teeth.  For this reason, retained milk teeth should be removed by a veterinarian as soon as possible.

Enamel Hypoplasia: Areas of defective enamel formation.  This can be genetic, but can also be caused by viral infections or trauma to the developing tooth.

Improper Alignment/Malocclusion:  Tooth alignment is affected by several genetic factors including jaw structure, lip structure, number of teeth, and retention of baby teeth.  However tooth placement can in some cases be caused by an injury to the jaw or habits such as excessive chewing, repeated carrying or fetching of very hard objects (such as rocks or a training dummy).  A dog’s “bite” is evaluated based on the way his teeth fit when his upper and lower jaws are closed.  Examples are provided below.

bullet

Scissors Bite:  The upper incisors just overlap and touch the lower incisors. This arrangement prevents wear on the incisors and keeps the teeth in alignment.  A scissors bite is the ideal bite for many breeds, including the Shiloh Shepherd. 

bullet

Level Bite: The incisors meet edge to edge. A level bite is acceptable, but not ideal.

bullet

Overshot Bite/Brachygnathism:  The upper jaw is longer than the lower and the upper front incisors project beyond the lower front incisors.  Produces a “chinless” or parrot-like appearance. 

bullet

Undershot Bite/ Prognathism:  The lower jaw is longer than the upper jaw, similar (depending on the severity of the malocclusion) to the bite of a Bulldog.

bullet

Wry Bite/WryMouth:  When one side of the jaw has grown longer than the other, resulting in malocclusion of the teeth in the front of the jaw. Neither the canines nor the incisors line up squarely in a wry mouth.

bullet

Anterior Crossbite: When some, but not all, of the lower incisors extend beyond the upper incisors but all other teeth mesh properly.

bullet

Crowded Bite: When the teeth are overcrowded, sometimes overlapping.  Dogs with crowded bites sometimes have narrow jaws/muzzles, or retained puppy teeth. 

bullet

Crooked Teeth: Can be caused by crowding in a too-small or too-narrow jaw and can also be the result of damage to the mouth.

bulletDropped Incisors: When the center lower incisors are shorter than normal. Sometimes they will tip slightly outward and, when viewed in profile, may give the appearance of a bite that is slightly undershot.  Dropped incisors tend to run in families.

Treatment:

bullet

Treatment: All dogs, whether their dentition is perfect or imperfect, need routine dental care.  Minor bite faults have only minimal impact on the dog’s ability to function.  Other than routine dental care to prevent tooth decay and check for excess wear, minor cases of malocclusions or imperfect dentition should not require treatment.  Generally only extreme cases of improper dentition require surgical intervention.  Surgery is generally put off until after the dog is mature and his jaw has finished growing.

Links to sites about this disease:

bullet

http://www.navhda.com/dentition.html
http://www.ottawavet.com/healthinfo/ncandent.htm
http://www.ashgi.org/articles/teeth_bite_me.htm
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/terms.htm#Teeth
http://www.ashgi.org/articles/fact_teeth.htm
http://www.aggieanimaldentalservice.com/conditions.html

This summary provided by:

bullet

Jessica S

bullet

Wildfire Kennel

 

 

Dedicated to improving the health of ISSR Shiloh Shepherds.

 


Copyright © 1998 - 2009. Shiloh Shepherd Dog™ Club of America.
All rights reserved. Revised: January 2008

The information on this website was written by ISSR breeders and other concerned individuals, however we are are NOT veterinarians. This information is being provided as a general overview, from information we were able to find about each disease through our own research. These summaries are not intended to be relied upon as medical or veterinary advice, nor do we consider ourselves experts in the veterinary field or in any of these conditions. While we do our best to provide the most up to date information, new research is constantly being done on these diseases. We recommend that you do further study and talk to your veterinarian on any topics you see here, as we cannot guarantee that the information posted here is the most current information available.  This site was originally designed and maintained by Debbie Knatz.