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Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy_____

 

Common names or abbreviations:

bulletHypertrophic osteodystrophy

Description or definition:

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This condition is a developmental bone disease that usually affects large breed puppies between the ages of 2-8 months of age.  “Hyper” means excessive, “trophy” or “trophic” refers to growth.  Hypertrophic osteodystrophy is the abnormal and excessive growth of bone.  HOD occurs when there is a disturbance in the blood supply to the growth plate, leading to delays in bone production.  The weakened bones develop microscopic fractures which result in inflammation, pain, and lameness.  In mild cases, the dog can make a full recovery with appropriate treatment. In severe cases, the condition can result in systemic illness and deformity of the limbs. 

This condition is thought to be genetic, however, viral diseases such as distemper, severe respiratory problems, improper nutrition (including over-nutrition) vitamin C deficiencies and other metabolic defects may also play a role in development of the disease.  There is also some speculation that the condition can occur as a result of vaccine reaction, particularly in immune deficient dogs.

Symptoms:

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Pain, swollen and swollen limbs, shifting lameness or refusal to bear weight on various different limbs at different periods of time, loss of appetite, listlessness.  Usually the damage is symmetrical and all of the limbs will show symptoms.  Often the symptoms will appear, go in remission for a week, and then appear in a different limb.  In more severe cases the puppy may exhibit extreme listlessness, depression, fever, anorexia (refusal to eat), weight loss, and reluctance to stand and/or walk.  Most puppies will exhibit signs of this condition between 2 and 8 months of age.

Diagnosis:

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Veterinarians look at whether the dog shows signs of the disease and is a member of a breed commonly affected with this condition.  The diagnosis is then confirmed by taking a series of radiographs (x-rays).

Treatment:

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Treatment is primarily supportive and depends on the severity of the condition and the type of symptoms exhibited.   In very mild cases the condition may spontaneously.  However most dogs will require some level of supportive care.  In most cases treatment is begun with doses of Prednisone.  Intravenous fluids are given to dogs with a high fever or dehydration.  Aspirin, carprofen, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and  narcotics may be given to control pain and inflammation.  It is often recommended to discontinue feeding high-calorie diets and additional vitamin and mineral supplementation (particularly vitamin C and calcium).

Links to sites about this disease:

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http://www.workingdogs.com/doc0046.htm

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http://www.ivis.org/special_books/ortho/chapter_50/50mast.asp

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http://www.greatdanelady.com/articles/lets_talk_about_hod.htm

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http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/saortho/chapter_50/50mast.htm

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http://www.angelfire.com/az2/iscaz/hypertrophic__osteodystrophy.htm

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http://siriusdog.com/articles/hod‑hypertrophic‑osteodystrophy‑dog.htm

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http://www.petplace.com/articles/artShow.asp?artID=46

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http://www.petposts.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=67&page=1

This summary provided by:

bulletJessica S
bulletWildfire Kennel

 

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Copyright © 1998 - 2009. Shiloh Shepherd Dog™ Club of America.
All rights reserved. Revised: January 2008

The information on this website was written by ISSR breeders and other concerned individuals, however we are are NOT veterinarians. This information is being provided as a general overview, from information we were able to find about each disease through our own research. These summaries are not intended to be relied upon as medical or veterinary advice, nor do we consider ourselves experts in the veterinary field or in any of these conditions. While we do our best to provide the most up to date information, new research is constantly being done on these diseases. We recommend that you do further study and talk to your veterinarian on any topics you see here, as we cannot guarantee that the information posted here is the most current information available.  This site was originally designed and maintained by Debbie Knatz.